Christian Author: Nancy W. Boyer

Chaplains Make a Difference “Would you care to say a prayer with me?”

My husband was a chaplain in the Navy for many years.  He is still called upon to do military funerals and this means a great deal to him. He often stops by a table in a restaurant and thanks an older veteran or a young service man for their “service to our country”.  A dear friend of ours has served on a number of tours to Afghanistan and other areas of the world as a Christian chaplain.  Some chaplains, however, who served faithfully and  given more than could be expected, have never received the highest honor our nation has to offer, but one will finally have that honor….62 years late. ..thanks to fellow soldiers who are senior citizens now.

Chaplain Emil Kapaun

Chaplain Emil Kapaun

Writings  by Sharon Cohen  and Lawrence Grayson tells us the story of  Chaplain Emil Kapaun in what is called the “Forgotten War”…Korea.  In the light of recent events of North Korea’s threats, it would be good to not forget what our troops suffered there and sacrificed to make what is now South Korea the vibrant nation that it is today.

On Easter morning, March 25, 1951, the Catholic priest mounted the steps  of a partially destroyed church, and turned to face his congregation,  some 60 men – gaunt, foul-smelling, in tattered clothing.

Fr. Emil  Kapaun raised a small, homemade, wooden cross to begin a prayer service,  led the men in the Rosary, heard the confessions of the Catholics, and  performed a Baptism.  Then, he wept because there was no bread or wine  to consecrate so that the men could receive the Eucharist.”

“The Rev. Emil Kapaun was weak, his body wracked by pneumonia and dysentery. After six brutal months in the hellish camp, the once sturdy Kansas farmer’s son could take no more. Thousands of soldiers had already died, some starving, others freezing to death. Now the end was near for the chaplain.Lt. Mike Dowe said goodbye to the man who’d given him hope during those terrible days. The young West Point grad cried, even as the chaplain, he says, tried to comfort him with his parting words: “Hey, Mike, don’t worry about me. I’m going to where I always wanted to go and I’ll say a prayer for all of you.”
Lt. Robert Wood wept, too, watching the Roman Catholic chaplain bless and forgive his captors. He helped carry Kapaun out of the mud hut and up a hill on a stretcher after Chinese soldiers ordered he be moved to a hospital — a wretched, maggot-filled place the POWs dubbed “the death house.” There was little or no medical care there. Kapaun died on May 23, 1951.
These two soldiers — and many more — never forgot their chaplain. Not his courage in swatting away an enemy soldier pointing a gun at a GI’s head. Not his talent for stealing food, then sneaking it to emaciated troops. Not the inspiring way he rallied his “boys,” as he called them, urging them to keep their spirits up.Chaplain Emil Kapaun4The plain-spoken, pipe-smoking, bike-riding chaplain was credited with saving hundreds of soldiers during the Korean War…”Chaplain Emil Kapaun3
What was Fr.  like as a person?
Roy Wenzl tells us. “Father Emil Kapaun was considered an unusual man even before the 8th Cavalry’s 3rd Battalion was overrun at Unsan.
Many devout Christians believe, for example, that they must overtly preach Christianity, but Kapaun by all accounts never lectured, never forced it. What he did instead was scrounge food for soldiers, write letters to their families, pass his tobacco pipe around for a few puffs, and run through machine gun fire, rescuing wounded. If he brought up religion in foxholes, he asked permission first: “Would you care to say a prayer with me?”
He treated Protestants, Jews and atheists the same way he treated Catholics — and he treated Catholics like loved ones. Some GIs did not like some chaplains. They loved this one
.…Survivors at Unsan broke out and fought south through the hills. Most were captured. Chinese soldiers stole their watches, rings, helmets and boots. Some of them thought this was the end, that they’d be shot now. The enemy in Korea frequently murdered prisoners. Sgt. Herb Miller, his ankle shredded and bleeding, rode away from slaughter on Kapaun’s back.Lt. Walt Mayo, who had saved Kapaun the first time he was captured at Unsan, escaped from the perimeter with his friend Phil Peterson, running across a road covered with dead Chinese. They were captured three days later. Mayo, who spent four months in a German prisoner of war camp in World War II, would spend 34 months in a camp more deadly.”

After all these years, with pressure on Washington and so many hundreds of Korean veterans dying, the honor due this chaplain is finally happening.

This brave chaplain will finally receive this country’s Medal of Honor.  Two lieutenants who served with him, now age 85 and 86, will join in the ceremony to honor Chaplain Kapaun.  “What he did and what he meant is so important,” Dowe says. “It’s worth finding a way to carry that forward. … I can only say I’m glad it’s happening. It’s a shame it couldn’t have been sooner.”Chaplain Emil Kapaun2

  Ray Kapaun, a family member, says, ” This day would never have arrived without their (fellow soldiers’) persistence. Some didn’t live to witness the ceremony, but others will finally see their beloved chaplain given the recognition they’ve called for so long.
Under extreme circumstances, this Chaplain would ask a soldier if he could minister to their needs…physically or spiritually.    How often do we have that same opportunity when a person is in trouble, sick or dying, or simply sad.  How difficult we find  to step out of our comfort and just ask.  How often is the opportunity not taken……to say…..  “Would you care to say a prayer with me?”

One response

  1. Thank you for writing. I am not certain about “brain dead” on comment for many people who write me seem very much “alive”. However, I am most happy to add your email to my notification list if you care to send it to me. My email is boyerwrites@yahoo.com I do not do much with twitter and don’t have time for Facebook. You will be added automatically if you click to “follow” Boyer Writes ..and each time I post you will get it. As to previous posts, just go to my site and at the top are categories that you can look up anything you may be interested in. Again, thank you for writing and blessings to you in your own endeavors.

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    April 11, 2013 at 05:39