Christian Author: Nancy W. Boyer

Rising Above Rejections

Throughout history and in more modern history, there is a lesson of rising above rejection.   Let’s look at the meaning of rejection and how it effects our lives.

Rejection:  The noun rejection can refer to the actual act of rejecting something or to the feeling one has after being rejected. In other words, you might have feelings of rejection after experiencing the rejection of others.

When we are finding love in our lives, we may have experienced rejection when someone turned us down for a date…or even a marriage proposal.   Rejection is also felt when a person may ask for a divorce.  It could even mean when family members decide not to be part of the family unit.   These are all hard experiences.   Many people experience; feel terrible about it and then decide that life must go on and rise above it.

In history, we read about the lives of very famous people who have experienced rejection in the public arena and made amazing comebacks.   Here are a few to consider:

Abe Lincoln Rail SpliterAbraham Lincoln is one of our most famous Presidents.  His heart-aches, illnesses, and rejections should encourage anyone to keep trying.  This list is long, but worth reading:

  • 1832   Lost job   Elected company captain of Illinois militia in Black Hawk War
  • 1833   Failed in business
  •  1834   Elected to Illinois State Legislature
  • 1835 Sweetheart died
  • 1836 Had a nervous breakdown
  •  1842  A jealous man challenged him to a duel.  Abraham Lincoln traveled to Alton to meet James Shields in a duel. Friends of both opponents negotiated a truce, and the duel was averted.
  • Reelected to Illinois Legislature and received license to practice law
  • 1837  Led Whig delegation in moving Illinois state capital from Vandalia to Springfield.   He became law partner of John T. Stuart
  • 1838  Defeated for Speaker, but was nominated for Illinois House Speaker by Whig caucus   Re-elected to Illinois House (running first in his district)
    Served as Whig floor leader
  • 1839  Chosen presidential elector by first Whig convention and  admitted to practice law in U.S. Circuit Court
  • 1840  Argues first case before Illinois Supreme Court
    Re-elected to Illinois state legislature
  • 1842  Admitted to practice law in U.S. District Court
  • 1843 Defeated for nomination for Congress
  • 1844  Established own law practice with William H. Herndon as junior partner
  • 1846  Elected to Congress
  • 1848  Lost nomination  (Chose not to run for Congress, abiding by rule of rotation among Whigs.)
  • 1849  Rejected for Land Officer    Admitted to practice law in U.S. Supreme Court
    Declined appointment as secretary and then as governor of Oregon Territory
  • 1854  Defeated for U.S. Senate
  • 1856  Defeated for nomination for Vice President
  • 1858  Again defeated for U.S. Senate
  • 1860  ELECTED PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A few other modern-day Presidents had their setbacks before winning the Presidency.

-Reagan_on_horsebackFormer California Gov. Ronald Reagan ran for the 1976 Republican presidential nomination. Incumbent President Gerald Ford beat him in the crucial New Hampshire and Florida primaries. Though Reagan was able to win some of the later contests that year, Ford edged him out at the convention.

 

 

 

 

Bill-Clinton-cigar-AP-by John GapsIII

Photo by John Gaps III

In his first race for office, Bill Clinton narrowly lost to incumbent Republican House member John Paul Hammerschmidt of Arkansas. He later became attorney general and then governor.  But he lost his first gubernatorial reelection race in 1980.

 

 

 

George W. Bush also entered political life by challenging an incumbent House member. In 1978, he ran against Texas Democrat Kent Hance, who mocked the Yale graduate as a clueless preppy from Connecticut. Hance won.

  • P20914-13.jpg

Photo by Eric Draper, Courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Library

  • Barack Obama

    Photo credit: AP Photo/Manuel Balce CenetaIn 2000

  • Barack Obama ran in an Illinois Democratic primary against Representative Bobby Rush. Like George W. Bush, he found that an Ivy League education was not necessarily an advantage. Representative Rush exploited Obama’s Harvard law degree to suggest that he was out of touch with the district. Rush smashed him by a two-to-one margin.

 

 

To all aspiring writers, take hope from some of the best and most successful.

Rejection Letters from publishers:

JK Rowlings got 12 rejections before making a billion dollars on Harry Potter.

Dr. Seuss’s rejection said “Too different from other juveniles on the market to warrant its selling.”

William Golding  The Lord of the Flies

William Golding wrote The Lord of the Flies, selling 15 million copies.  His rejection letter said, “An absurd and uninteresting fantasy which was rubbish and dull”

(Credit about these 3 authors from a young writer, Christian Mihai, who is following my novel, The Seeds .  Thanks, Christian)

As all can see, perseverance is always the best policy if we believe we have something to give to this world.  I write because I enjoy it and it’s challenging.   I may never have a great book published that the world will remember or make a fortune.  That is not my goal, but joy in what I do is worth all the effort.  In fact, my mind is completely absorbed, when I am writing, from the disappointments that could bring me down.

Rising above your rejections, whatever they may be, will bring  renewed life and hope into your world.   Never give up!

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