N.W.BOYER…Christian Author

Posts tagged “Blue Ridge Parkway

THE SINS OF THE FATHERS and PROMISES

If you are asking the question WHY would anyone feel that they can destroy property, attack innocent citizens or make the United States of America into a country of rioting and vandalism? You are not alone. Probably many Americans and people around the world are scratching their heads and asking….WHY?…WHY?…WHY?

This blog does not intend to answer that question, but there is a THEORY to why people of all colors and backgrounds…young and older…are acting the way they are.

One young woman cried out to the rioting people to” break glass…take all you want…for it is REPARATIONS for the past!” Is there any truth in what she said? NO, of course not! There are other ways to solve problems… of the past, present and future than to destroy the hard-earned businesses of people of all colors. Blaming a generation for the sins of past generations solves nothing. She is falling into the hands of the anarchists who would destroy our country.

Does she really understand how far the search for fairness to all people living today has come? Does she know that through people like Martin Luther King, Jr. that people began to see the wrongs and our government passed the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights for all people? This behavior is only an excuse to do the wrong thing, which results in hurting all people.

You ask, “What theory are you speaking of in all this madness?”

It might be summed up in one Scripture Verse from the Holy Bible:

The Holy Scripture talks about the “sins of the fathers” to the third and fourth generations and even Shakespeare uses this quote in his writing of The Merchant of Venice: “The sins of the father are to be laid upon the children.”

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In the small towns of America, there are people, whose early families were immigrants…not slaves, who believe that the “sins of the fathers” should be remembered and MADE RIGHT, as much as possible. I’m going to share with you a true story of a place in the mountains of which I am quite familiar.

Our former VA home was close to the famous Blue Ridge Parkway of the Appalachian Mountains. While living there, I read an article about a man who knew about the slaves that worked the area on the Langhorne farm in Virginia. This was before the Civil War and there was an unmarked burial place near the lovely little village of Meadows of Dan. When the article was written, there was only a small wooden split rail fence where the bodies of the slaves had been buried This also included some small children of the slaves. When the Park Service was building the Blue Ridge Parkway, the land became part of their domain. The headstones had been torn out and thrown in the woods. Nothing remained to show who was buried in this specific spot, but some of the old timers of the area knew.

One afternoon, I went looking for the rail fence, which turned out to be at the entrance to the Parkway at Meadows of Dan. Parking at the local church, I walked over to the area. Nothing was there to identify the graves of the slaves who had lived, worked, and died here. Only a small, rail fence circled the area.

“What a shame that there is nothing to identify it,” I thought to myself. The millions of people yearly, who ride the Parkway, will zoom right by this historical, sacred spot. Most people will travel on to visit places where the old timers settled, like the old Mabry Mill right down the road, but they will never know the history of this place where a plantation owner buried those who labored for him.

In this age of monuments being torn down of the famous men of the Civil War era and the present day stressful problems of racial disharmony, it was heartening to know that there were white people who had been trying to convince the Park Service to do the right thing for many years. Unfortunately, as is the history of all bureaucratic, government agencies, slow or forever slow is the story. It definitely was in the case of these slaves having a proper monument.

After six months away from the Blue Ridge, I rounded the curving entrance to Meadows of Dan and there it was…..the old slave cemetery that I had written about in my book, Old Timers of the Blue Ridge. Now, it actually had a marker! A large, beautiful granite headstone stood inside the split rail fence. 18

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My husband and I stopped, walked up to the monument and the last words stood out to me…FOREVER FREE! Yes, they have gone on to be with God, Who made all people…black, white, and every shade of color. They are free at last, but are we living free from the past? Is it possible, no matter how hard people try… to be removed, in this modern world where hate runs deep, from the “sins of the fathers?” This is a question of gigantic proportions!

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Hurrying home to check the internet, I had to know the story of how this monument was placed here in the year that I was away from Virginia. This is what I found out: Matt Burnett, an old time resident of the area, had been one of the workers who tore out the headstones for the Park Service and he asked Bob Heafner to make him a special promise. That was thirty-three years ago.

“Burnett asked Heafner if he would make sure that people would someday KNOW ABOUT THE FORGOTTEN SLAVES hidden in plain sight next to a road traveled by millions.

Heafner was young then, a businessman and a publisher who knew people in Meadows of Dan and up and down the parkway. Surely, Burnett thought, Heafner could find a way to place a monument or memorial to those people, so that their lives wouldn’t remain buried in the past….Heafner discovered a will that stated James Steptoe Langhorne had at least five slaves and perhaps owned more than 10 at one time. He also found the names of five other African-Americans who were probably buried in the cemetery. Three of them died enslaved, with history having no record of their last names:

Charles (a child who died in 1858),

John (who was 19 when he died in 1858)

and Ellen (a 1-year-old who died in 1862).

The two other people Heafner documented died after the Civil War:

Guss Langhorne (another 1-year-old who died in 1871)

and Susan Langhorne (born a slave, died free in 1871 at age 28). It is unclear why the latter two had the Langhorne name. 19

It took a number of people to finally get results of placing the granite stone where it should have been long ago, including finding the granite company owner who was willing to make the stone.

This grave site was part of a history of the South. The mountain people strongly defend their history. People come far and wide to see the reenactments of the Civil War between the North and the South near Ararat, VA. The important points of this story are that the Blue Ridge people also believe in keeping their promises and doing right by the slaves that are buried in this cemetery regardless of the actions of the people of the past. Throughout our country, especially in the South, there are many people who feel the same way. They definitely should not be condemned for the “sins of the fathers” when they were not born during this terrible time of history.

Who exactly was James Steptoe Langhorne of Meadows of Dan, the land owner where the slave cemetery is located?

“According to family history, Henry let his son James Steptoe Langhorne choose one of the plantations, and after touring them all, James Steptoe, age about 22, looked out over the 13, 000 acre “Langdale” plantation in Meadows of Dan, Virginia, and said it was the most beautiful sight he had ever seen! In fact, he is credited with giving that area its name, Meadows of Dan—located in the foothills of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains, on the Dan River. He chose to settle there, but was blinded by retinitis pigmentosa – an inherited family disease– within just a couple of years—and never actually saw his beloved land again! James Steptoe Langhorne, called “Grandpa Steptoe” by his grandchildren, married Elizabeth Rachel Omohundro and together they had eight children, and adopted at least two more. Of course, on a 13,000-acre plantation in 1822 Virginia, Grandpa Steptoe owned slaves. It doesn’t matter how abhorrent and embarrassing this practice might be to me today, it is a part of our history. ” It was from Patrick County, VA that he built his massive plantation along with the slaves who worked it. He also gave land and built at least two churches. The Meadows of Dan Baptist church is where he and his wife are buried. His father and original family were emigrants from Wales, arriving in 1666. (credit Helen Houlshouser…relative to James Steptoe Langhorne)

If you are traveling the beautiful Blue Ridge, stop in at the little slave cemetery at the corner of the Meadows of Dan exit. Spend a few minutes considering the long-reaching meaning of who is buried there and give a “thank you” to one of the many merchants down the road in Meadows of Dan that helped promote the erection of the slave memorial stone. We especially thank the man who kept his promise, Bob Heafner.

“Slavery was common in Patrick County. According to county historian Tom Perry, as many as 2,000 slaves were part of Patrick County’s 9,000 residents in 1850. The majority of those enslaved people were owned by the prominent Reynolds and Hairston families. The Reynolds were the founders of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s father owned 28 slaves, according to Perry. Slavery was less prevalent up on the mountain in Meadows of Dan, where five families owned slaves, according to an Appalachian State University research project commissioned by the park service.” 20

Even though time has passed and we live in a new era, those who came out to see the placing of the new marker at the Meadows of Dan, know that it is important to the families of those who may have buried relatives in this grave site. There is a new Database of identities of 3,200 slaves through the historical society of VA that can help people find their descendants. Information can be found beginning with the American colonies in 1619 through unpublished private documents.

The most important thing is to remember the men, women and children who worked the land by force. We must also not forget that African Americans and slaves from other areas were not only those who suffered great injustices. Native Americans endured the Trail of Tears and other horrors. The white settlers who had emigrated from Europe suffered at the hands of the Native Americans and the lawlessness of other Americans. Present day merchants, white and black, suffer when a life-time of work and businesses are destroyed by rioting. We could go on and on.

One may ask, “So where do we go from here? Will people never get over this tragic piece of history?” Because slavery in America may have caused many problems of today, this is a good question. How many generations will be affected by those who did terrible deeds of bringing slaves to America, as well as the off-spring of those who bought and sold them? How many generations will have to find new and better ways to compensate for the sins of the past or is that possible?

The great repentance of a rude, profane Slave Trader, John Newton gave us the beloved song, “Amazing Grace.” In 1748 he wrote “On that day, the Lord sent from on high and delivered me out of deep waters.” Only God’s amazing grace could “Save a Wretch like Me, ” he wrote. 21

The Fathers of our nation and the rich owners of slaves often had children with those they owned. Some of those children have embraced their lineage…become educated, successful and brought honor to generations after their enslaved fore-fathers. Reunions are held by those who can trace their legacy from a white slave owner to their slave mother. Healing is needed in our nation. Maybe owning the past is the answer as the Germans have had to own the Holocaust.

The Sins of the Fathers will only be healed when we find a way to remember that all people are sinners and need the grace of God to combat the past and bring forgiveness to the present. Listen to this promise God has given to all of us.

If my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and WILL HEAL THEIR LAND. 2nd Chronicles 7:14


The Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia

blue ridge Overview Best

The Blue Ridge Mountains, steeped in history and hard working people, is a special place.  It is our privilege to live here part of the year and in doing so, we have seen the beauties of the land and its people.   My recent book, Old Timers of the Blue Ridge and More, is a collection of stories behind generations of families who have worked the land and farmed the fields.  The fog rolls in over the mountains from North Carolina into Virginia.  It is a silent mist that cools the summers and brings the breeze that is felt daily.

Below is a video that I have produced with many of the photographs that I have taken of these wonderful mountains in the years that we have been here.  I hope the sights and peaceful sounds will fill your day with God’s love and joy.

Even now, in early August,  the fields are ready for a summer harvest and the corn is growing high.  The peach juice drips down the chin with every bite.  The aroma of peach pie baking in the oven is in the air.peaches 2017.JPG

The migrant workers, along with the farm owners, work late into the night to harvest and package the produce, moving it on to our groceries far down the mountain.   The rumble of the tractors and the rhythm of the trucks pass our house as they move on to the Painter warehouse, just off the Blue Ridge Parkway,  to be processed.

Take the winding road down the mountain until you find acres and acres of apples, peaches and more at the Harold Orchards in Ararat, Virginia.   They have been farming this orchard for generations.  H.C. told me that without the workers who come in from Mexico, his business would go under.  Many of these workers come year after year to bring in the harvest.

It is our privilege to honor these hard-working farmers who produce the crops of corn, cabbage, broccoli, apples, peaches and much more.  Without them or the workers they hire, our grocery stores would be dependent on foreign providers.

Thank you, Gentlemen.    You are the best!

VIDEO:   BLUE RIDGE:   Photographed and produced by N.W. Boyer  (All rights reserved).

Turn on sound.

 

credits: music “On Golden Pond”

 

 


Photography on the Blue Ridge

The mountains of Virginia have been buried in snow and shortly the mountain will awaken to the warmth of the sun.  I’d like to introduce you to Photography by Boyer.  Throughout the summer, I will be sharing my photographic adventures. At times, it may even be a travelogue through pictures.  If you are interested in photography and would like to be notified when pictures are uploaded on my photography blog, just send me an email (boyerwrites@yahoo.com or howey126@hotmail.com ) or follow on Photography by Boyer.

See the photography of the  beautiful Blue Ridge during our stay in 2015 on this link:

Photography by Boyer

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READY FOR SPRING, SUMMER AND FALL!


The Beauty of the Blue Ridge in Fall

More recently I wrote about The Mountain Way of Virginia and North Carolina.  The history is fascinating and the people hardy, but the mountains are a marvelous beauty!    This week I spent driving along the Blue Ridge Parkway and visiting some of the small towns, like Floyd, VA.   The towns vary, but all have the Mom and Pop restaurants with home cooking: grits, country ham, fluffy biscuits with or without a rich, brown gravy.

It seems that “outsiders” have found the mountains, as I have run into a Greek restaurant owner; a Colorado sign maker,  and  Jacksonville Center for the Arts  in Floyd  has invited musicians from the Czech Republic and a pianist from Russia.  Yes, Blue grass music is widely played, but it is not all that is part of the mountains.

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Rich in history; proud of their past…one will see memorials to the Civil  War dead and those who fought the elements to live in this beautiful place…like Ed and Lizzie Mabry who built their Mill…now preserved for all to enjoy on the Parkway.

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Mabry Mill

Today, you are going to have a visual experience.  As you look, thank God for all He has created and share it with friends and family that may not have a mountain experience.

Fall Tree sm

Sugar Maple

Fall leaves 2015 sm

Sugar Maple Leaves

Little hole in mountain leaves sm

View off the Blue Ridge Parkway in Virginia

Pumpkins in the Fields

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Horses and Cows graze along the Blue Ridge

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Split Rail Fence frames the Blue Ridge Parkway beauty

 

 


The Mountain Way

Blue Ridge mountains Fox RunFrom the first time I rode up the steep mountain from North Carolina to Fancy Gap, Virginia, I knew it was a special place.  It took, however, living here as a “flat lander” to get to know the mountain people.  One may ask, “What is a flat lander?”    Those are the people who come from places far south…like Florida.

This “flat lander” had grown up in the Brushy Mountains of North Carolina and later in the Winston-Salem area.  I was blessed with a big family…about 15 first cousins and many aunts and uncles…in that area, but my parents moved away from the cold of the mountains to the warmth of Florida.  It took me over 50 years to return to my roots…even if for a few months of the year.

I found more than I had expected….a whole way of life that I now call the “Mountain Way”.   It first became clear to me when my husband and I were looking for a second, get-away place in the Virginia area.   The realtor who showed us around drove us in a 4-wheeler up a steep mountain that leveled out onto a pasture land with a beautiful view of the Blue Ridge.   (In case the Blue Ridge is new to any of my readers, it is a stretch of mountains running over 400 miles through several southern states.   The building of this wonderful place is another story, but briefly it was to give the people work during the depression.  The wonderful rock bridges; scenic overlooks and miles of blooming rhododendron is worth the trip.  Dogwoods blossom in the spring and there seems to be waves of trees and flowering bushes that make their entrance to the place known as the Blue Ridge Parkway.)Va flowering2

Back to my first introduction to the mountain way.  The realtor stopped the car and a farmer who was bailing his hay made his way up slowly in our direction.  No one introduced us, but the farmer and the realtor began an extensive discussion about his land.  This conversation seemed to be quite long about almost nothing to those of us flat landers who like to get things done quickly.   We sat quietly and listened.  Finally something was mentioned about my early years down the mountain…in N.C. and all of my relatives there.  There was a complete change of mood…and accepting smiles.  We found out that the realtor knew what he was doing because in the mountains  it is customary to “visit a while” before getting down to business.

Family relations mean everything to the mountain people.   I was to find out that many of the old farms date back before the Civil War. One young man told us that his family was given hundreds of acres by the King of England, before the Revolutionary War.  This land remains in his  family until this day. One can see scattered around the hills little family cemeteries.

Mountain people, we are told, are glad that the outsiders come to the mountains…enjoy the area…and spend their money to help an ailing economy, but they have “about all the friends they need.”   Almost everyone is related to someone…or if they are not, they have grown up with them and know all the family members.

These warm and friendly people are strong in their beliefs…as this is also known as the Bible Belt.  Faith is important.  When a politician made a remark about people “clinging to their guns and Bibles”.   A truer statement could have not been made…even if it was said with some sarcasm.   Even recently, we noticed that when the controversy about the Confederate flag made the people of the mountain think that their southern history was being attacked, the few Confederate flags suddenly became many flags being flown from porches or alongside the American flag.    “Don’t tell us what should be politically correct here in the south….and don’t even think  about taking away our guns!”  one might hear a mountain man or woman say.  While living here, we have not seen racial bias…which is not to say there isn’t any.   One thing is certain.   These are a strong people… a proud people…with mountain ways which anyone who plans to live here will be smart to learn and appreciate.

The mountain people have dug their roots deep into the soil. They are unpretentious and comfortable in who they are.   It may be the older men who sit around at the local store passing the time or the hefty man in bib overalls talking on his cell phone about getting the cooler ready for a side of beef.  Everyone shares their vegetables of corn, tomatoes, cucumbers, spinach and some things I didn’t know grew in the ground.spinach Almost each time my husband returned from choir practice, he had a bag full of the latest items grown in someone’s garden.

Mountain stories and the history of the area tell of tough times when people tackled the cold of winter while raising huge families down in some of the mountain passes and hollows (low place in the mountain known as a “holler”). There are places with names like Buffalo Mountain, Fancy Gap, Groundhog Mountain and more than one can remember of gaps and passes.  (*see history books below)  The deer roam freely and stop their eating to stare at those of us passing by. deer sm

We had only just moved into our Virginia house when  a man came down the road asking if we had seen his cow?   It appeared that the cow had gotten through the fence…as did a very large, black bull that also came down our road.   People in the mountains help each other…even the flat landers.   Our neighbors arrived from Florida one snowy day and could not get up their steep driveway.  Hearing the spinning tire noise, it was not long before another mountain neighbor came with his tractor to pull them the rest of the way up the drive.

Ever hear of the two finger way?  Almost all mountain people use it.  This means, regardless of who it may be…the passing driver will raise his two fingers off the stearing wheel to give a little wave as the other driver passes.   My first impression of that was, “Do we know them?”  The answer of course  is “no”…but it is the friendly mountain way.

Music is a wonderful part of the mountains.   Tonight we rode the parkway to the Music Center to hear a concert of country music along with the “blue grass” strumming of banjo, guitar, bass, and more.  One of the best of the best is a gentleman named Wayne Henderson.  wayne henderson sm Mr. Henderson has a tiny workshop where he makes guitars.  These are so sought after that a person may wait years to get one…and at a very hefty price.  He is a man of the mountains who has been honored for his contribution and preservation of mountain music…even playing in Carnegie Hall.

Below is a video that I’d like to share with you because this blog may become a book if I continue. The fact is  I may write more about my experiences here in the mountains where the August temperature moves easily from 65-75 degrees, with a cool mountain breeze.  Today this “flat lander” is glad to be in the mountains…enjoying the mountain ways and the wonderful people here.

Wayne Henderson video:

History books about the Blue Ridge areas found on Amazon.

The Man Who Moved a Mountain  by Richard Davids

Orlean Puckett: The Life of a Mountain Midwife  by Karen C. Smith