N.W.BOYER…Christian Author

Posts tagged “Poland

D Day Must NEVER be Forgotten

D Day graves at Normandy France

Saturday, June 6, is the date we remember  D-Day

This Day of courage must never be pushed into the background while the world looks on at the daily news.  Boyer Writes honors all those who bravely faced the possibility of certain death for the cause of freedom

On Omaha Beach alone, 2,400 American lives were lost…as were many thousands more of our allied countries during the war.

 

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Here are some facts about that day when so many were brave!

  • The First D-Day Happened in the early 1900’s

D-Day-Facts

The term D-Day is a generic term used by the military since the early 1900s to describe the date a combat operation takes place. Because of the monumental nature of the Allied invasion of Normandy, that day on June 6th 1944 became legendary. Ever since, people have been fascinated by D-Day facts, and the term D-Day for most people now means the date in history when the Allies started to win the war in Europe.

  • D-Day Could Have Happened A Day Earlier on June 5th, 1944

D-Day was actually supposed to happen the day before, on June 5th 1944. However, because of bad weather, it was decided that the D-Day invasion would take place the following day, on June 6th.D Day3

  • D-Day Changed the Landscape and History of Normandy

The D-Day invasion took place in a coastal area of France, known as Normandy. Despite the region’s rich history, it is now most famously remembered as the scene of this bloody invasion

  • D-Day Was Code named Neptune by the Allies

The code name for the Normandy Landings was Operation Neptune. Neptune is the Greek god of the sea, and it’s a fitting name, considering the invasion was launched from the sea.Landscape

 

  • German Troops Didn’t Leave the Islands Around Normandy until 1945

Although the Allies were successful in their invasion of Normandy, it was nearly a year later, on May 9th 1945, that the entire German occupation of Normandy, including the surrounding islands, was completely ended.D Day 8

  • Operation Bodyguard Was a Fake Allied Operation to Hide D-Day Plans

In order to deceive the Germans, the Allies created a fake operation, Operation Bodyguard. This way, the Germans would not be sure of the exact date and location of the main Allied landings.

  • There Were Multiple Fake D-Day Plans

There were actually multiple fake operations designed to deceive the Germans. These included fake operations detailing attacks to the north and south of the actual landing points in Normandy. Some efforts were even made to make the Germans think that the attack would take place in Norway!

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  • Normandy Was a Tourist and Resort Area Before D-Day

One of the lesser-known D-Day facts is that the beaches of Normandy were a popular destination for visitors to the Atlantic coast before World War II. From the 1800s onwards, Normandy was a popular seaside tourist area. There are still many beautiful towns and resorts on the Normandy coast.

 

  • D-Day Was Planned for a Full Moon To Give Aircraft Better Sight

The Allies wanted a full moon to provide better sight for their aircraft. They also wanted to have one of the highest tides. The invasion was carefully scheduled to land partway between low tide and high tide, with the tide coming in.D Day 7

  • D-Day was the Largest Multi-National Invasion in History

The Normandy Landings known as D-Day were a multinational effort, with many countries involved. The Allied forces invading Normandy included troops from the United States, Britain, Canada, Poland, France, and more countries.D Day 11

 

  • The Allied Forces Were 5 Years Younger than the Germans on Average

Many D-Day facts focus on the armaments each side had during the invasion. A lesser-known fact is the age of the German and the Allied forces. The German forces, due to heavy losses on the Eastern Front, no longer had a large population of young men to enlist. German soldiers were, on average, more than 5 years older than their Allied counterparts.

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  • D-Day Began when Troops Gathered on British Soil in June 1944

A lot of D-Day facts focus on Normandy, where the Allies landed. A commonly asked question is “where did the Allies launch their invasion?” The Normandy landings were conducted from across the English Channel, with troops first gathering on British soil before launching the attack on that fateful day in June 1944.

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  • D-Day was Only the First Part of a Larger Plan to Retake Europe

The D-Day invasion, codenamed Operation Neptune, was part of a larger plan to take the European continent back from the Germans. Operation Overlord was the name assigned to the large-scale plan, and Operation Neptune was the first phase of the plan.

 

  • The Draft of the D-Day Plan was First Accepted in 1943

Planning for the D-Day invasion began long before the event actually took place. Historical D-Day facts reveal that an initial draft of the invasion plan was accepted at a conference in August 1943.

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  • British General Bernard Montgomery Helped Eisenhower Plan D-Day

While a lot of D-Day facts focus on the numbers of ships, troops and military armaments, one fact that is often overlooked is the number of generals who planned the invasion. There were two generals: United States General Dwight D. Eisenhower and British General Bernard Montgomery planned the attack. It should be noted that Eisenhower was the Commander in Chief of Operation Overlord.

  • D-Day was the Largest Invasion by the Sea in History

Eisenhower and Montgomery reviewed the initial plans for D-Day and decided that a larger-scale invasion would be necessary. The goal of the Allies was to allow operations to move quickly, and to capture ports that were strategic to the overall plan of retaking the European continent.

  • More Than 150,000 Troops Landed on 50 miles of Beach on D-Day

It may be the epic scale of the D-Day invasion that explains just why people are so fascinated by D-Day facts. It was one of the largest single military operations of all time, with more than 150,000 troops landing on five beaches in just a 50-mile stretch of land.

  • 7 Days After D-Day More Than 300,000 Troops Had Landed

The first set of troops landing at Normandy signaled only the beginning of the invasion. Within seven days, the beaches where the Allies landed on D-Day were fully under their control. Get ready for some more massive D-Day facts! By that time, more than 300,000 troops, 50,000 vehicles and over 100,000 tons of equipment had been brought through the beaches of Normandy! By the end of June 1944, the Allies had brought over 850,000 troops through the beaches of Normandy and ports that had been opened up as a result of the D-Day invasion.APTOPIX France D-Day Anniversary

  • Omaha Beach Was 1 of 5 Main Beaches of the D-Day Invasion

The Allies divided the 50 miles of the Normandy coast into five beaches, or sections. The beaches at Normandy were named: Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno and Sword.

  • Weather Delayed the D-Day Invasion by 1 Day

Many military historians who are interested in D-Day facts discuss how the weather impacted the D-Day invasion. In addition to delaying the invasion by one day, the weather blew the boats of the Allies east of their planned landing targets. This was especially true for the Utah and Omaha beach landing targets.

  • The Terrain of Omaha Beach Caused the High Number of Casualties

Omaha Beach was one of the areas where the Allies suffered the most casualties. The geography of the area played a role in the high number of casualties at Omaha Beach. High cliffs that lined the beach characterized the geography of the Omaha Beach landing target. Many American forces lost their lives because the Germans had gun positions on these high cliffs.

D Day Army Rangers.scaled cliffsjpg

The cliffside of Pointe du Hoc overlooking Omaha Beach in Saint-Pierre-du-Mont, Normandy, France. On June 6, 1944, U.S. Rangers scaled the coastal cliffs to capture a German gun battery. (Virginia Mayo / AP Picture below)

FILE PHOTO: Handout photo of a U.S. flag used as a marker on a destroyed bunker at Pointe du Hoc

  • More than 4,000 Allied Soldiers Died on D-Day

The saddest D-Day facts are the number of people who were injured, and the number of people who died, as a result of the invasion of Normandy. Due to the position of the German forces and the defenses they had built, the Allies suffered over 10,000 casualties, with over 4,000 people confirmed dead.

  • Over 2,400 American Soldiers Were Killed on Omaha Beach on D-Day

D-Day facts reveal that over 2,400 Americans were killed or injured on Omaha Beach. This was as a result of the geography of the Omaha Beach landing target, and the weather that had blown the ships off their target. The weather had also led to the sinking of some tanks which were intended to provide support for the troops landing at Omaha Beach. The high number of casualties at Omaha was also in part due to the lack of artillery providing reinforcements for the troops.

  • Germans Had Less Casualties on D-Day Due to their Positions

Due to their positions, the Germans suffered fewer casualties than the invading Allied troops at Normandy. However, the Germans had no reinforcements to help them retake positions. Once the Allies had landed at Normandy, they took control of the beaches and continued until all of Europe was free.

The massive scale of the D-Day invasion and its important role in World War II make D-Day facts fascinating, even today. Many people lost their lives fighting on the fateful day of June 6th 1944. The

Normandy landings were the beginning of a larger plan to retake Europe and codenamed Operation Overlord. Had the D-Day invasion failed, the result of World War II may have been very different. Thankfully, despite a heavy loss of life, the Allies were ultimately successful in taking the beaches of Normandy and retaking Europe.


  • Facts about D-Day Invasion Summary

D-Day facts continue to fascinate people, even more than 50 years after the D-Day invasion took place. We gathered interesting facts about that fateful day on June 6th 1944, when the large-scale invasion of Normandy, France took place. D-Day marked a turning point in World War II and dictated the course of history.
Military historians are interested in D-Day facts because of the sheer scale of the invasion. The saddest D-Day facts are those relating to the losses the Allies suffered during the course of the invasion. The people who lost their lives on the beaches of Normandy did not do so in vain, as D-Day marked the beginning of the Allies retaking Europe. (taken from Interesting Facts)

75th Remembrance of D-Day in 2019 Slide Presentation (Wait a moment for slide to change)

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Holocaust Remembrance Day….”NEVER AGAIN”

Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial Hall of Names in Israel

Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial Hall in Israel

Holocaust Remembrance Day is a time to remember and proclaim “NEVER AGAIN.” 

Having just posted about the horrors of Syria, which may be another Holocaust if a solution is not found to bring peace to the area, it is fitting to think about World War II and all those who perished under the Nazi dictator, Hitler.  It is estimated that over six million men, women and children died in the death camps.   Memorials can be found around the world.  One special one is the children’s memorial, Yad Vashem, in Jerusalem.  The day my husband and I visited this memorial, there were little lights on the ceiling and the name of each child was read aloud continuously.

Yad Vashim Children's Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem

Yad Vashem Children’s Memorial

 

It doesn’t seem like any time since I took Student Ambassadors to Poland and we visited Auschwitz, one of the death camps.  None of us will ever be the same.  I, as a Christian, walked beside a young Jewish student who laid flowers at the very wall where so many were executed.  I noticed that he wore his shorts but respectfully put on a tie and sports jacket as he approached the wall.

Auschwitz memorial at Yad Vashem

Auschwitz pictures at Yad Vashem (Photo credit Getty Images)

 

As we traveled, this same young man also wanted to find the apartment building where the Israeli Olympic team had been murdered by terrorists.  We looked and looked; finally finding a small plaque outside an apartment building to remember the event.  Given the gravity of this terrible tragedy, it seemed far too small.

Our student group spent time looking at the ovens where the bodies were burned.  One amazing fact was that the home of the military commander and his family was right next to the grounds of Auschwitz.  We saw the place where he was executed after the war by hanging.  Eye glasses, shoes and suitcases were piled high in glass cases.  One could see the torture chambers where a cross was scratched into the wall…indicating that not only Jews were interned there, but political prisoners and Christians.

shoes-yad-vashem

 

Steven Spielberg has made it his mission to record the lives of survivors so that future generations will understand what hatred, prejudice and war can do to people. Once the people who fought WWII and the Holocaust survivors have died, their voices will be silenced forever….except for these recordings.  Just as our World War II veterans are passing away by the hundreds each day, so are the survivors of the Holocaust.

It was my privilege to have the veterans and survivors come to my classroom of 5th graders and talk to each one of the students about their experiences.  Because each person’s story was different, the students took notes that they wrote us and presented orally to the class the following day.  Those students are adults now.  Many have finished college and have families of their own.  I pray that they have not forgotten that experience and are passing along what the Holocaust was and why we can never let this happen again.

After returning from that trip, I felt that the students in our Florida county needed to know as much about the Holocaust as possible.  With financial help from the community and parents of students, we raised enough funds to place in every school library tapes, books and age-appropriate material about the Holocaust.

Holocaust plaque St Annes Church Poland

I read about a grave-digger who was told to bury all the Jews in the woods. These were those shot on a death march.  Instead, he buried them in  St. Anna’s Roman Catholic Church in Swierklany, Poland.    This is only after he had carefully copied all the numbers from each victim’s arm.  Some seventy years later and with research from Yad Vashem in Israel, some relatives now know that Christians carefully buried the bodies of their loved ones.  A new memorial has been erected with a cross.   The new plaque at the previously unmarked grave in Swierlany, Poland now reads:

“In memory of the death march victims from Auschwitz-Birkenau”

and lists the victims’ concentration camp numbers or names.  The caring of one grave digging man, who believed differently from those he buried, made all the difference over 70 years later to a family who simply wanted to know what had happened to their loved one.

Today on Holocaust Remembrance Day, as the sirens wail,  in some places people will stop in the streets and cars will stop on the highways …wherever they are…to remember again. We too must never forget!

It is not our purpose here to try to re-create the horrors that went on here.  Probably the closest to that would be to watch Schindler’s List, produced by Spielberg, about a Christian businessman, Oskar Schindler,  who saved many Jews by taking them to work in his factory.

Oskar Schindler (28 April 1908 – 9 October 1974) was a German industrialist and a member of the Nazi Party who is credited with saving the lives of 1,200 Jews during the Holocaust by employing them in his enamelware and ammunitions factories in occupied Poland and the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia.   (Wikipedia)

VIDEO:     This music is played in honor of John Williams and his contribution to the telling of this story of the Holocaust and the saving of many lives.    (Turn up sound)

The Music from Schindler’s List, written by John Williams.


Who Put the Song into Chopin? For all Music Lovers…Voice and Piano

When I spent time in Ukraine, I was most impressed with the love of music that surrounds Kiev and the people of this part of Europe. I sat in on music lessons for young adults at the Kiev School of Music. Their talents were incredible.   Walk the streets and one will hear music coming from windows. The opera that I attended was probably the most beautiful that I have ever seen.

Who are the great composers whose music still lives long after their deaths?   One of them is Chopin.  His life was not a long one.  Born in 1810 and  being ill for some time, he died at the age of 39.  A virtuoso of the piano. He was  considered the “poet of the piano” and one of the great Romantic musicians.

Frederic Chopin, Polish Composer

The video that I have included in this writing is one on the life of Chopin and a young, modern man, James Rhodes, who set out to find information on the man whose music he loves to play.   He wanted to know who influenced him and who put the song into Chopin.  He needed to understand the background of this great Polish composer.   This took him not only to Warsaw, Poland, but to Paris.

Russian rule in Poland changed Chopin’s life forever…never able to return, but filling his life and music with his memories of and his love for Warsaw.   It is hard to imagine we are talking about Chopin as a very young man, much like James Rhodes.   Chopin composed at the age of seven and wrote piano concertos at 17;  fell in love at 19 but love was a hard part of his life.  James Rhodes also  feels that finding love is often difficult for most musicians…as it was for Chopin.   From 1837 to 1847 he carried on a relationship with the French writer Amantine Dupin, Baroness Dudevant, who wrote under the male pseudonym George Sand.  She even dressed at times like a man. This writer spent a winter in Majorca at an abandoned Carthusian monastery which she describes in one of her books. Chopin was ill with tuberculosis at this time and she left him before his death. One can still visit the monastery today.

George Sand, Author at the age of 34

At age 21, Chopin  went to Paris which was the cultural center of the world.  He reached out to this “music paradise”and especially to those who sang for operas.     He supported himself financially by sales of his compositions and as a piano teacher.

This video is about finding and living your passion.   Reaching our dreams often takes research as history teaches it to us.   How does history effect our own lives?    Can we learn lessons from those who have already lived?

In music…instruments are often connected.   Chopin found his inspiration for the piano from the human voice.   The composer finds his own style.  In the case of Chopin, his was one of delicate touch.   He played late into the evening and sometimes the people in the saloons would hear him, knowing his great talent.  “Fingers seemed to be brushed by an angel’s wing”  as one writer expresses.

Set aside time to see this entire documentary…at least 30 minutes.  I do not expect that all readers will have an interest, but for those who do have a passion for music…this is my written gift to you.   Enjoy!

VIDEO OF JAMES RHODES AND THE LIFE OF CHOPIN