N.W.BOYER…Christian Author

Posts tagged “Washington DC

Defending America From Anarchists

What does the word ANARCHIST mean? According to the dictionary, it is “One who uses violent means to overthrow the established order.” (Merriam Webster)

No one I know wants to see the “established order” overthrown. It is horrifying to see businesses burned to the ground when we can only imagine how hard the people worked to finally hang a sign “OPEN” on their doors!

Burning and looting of businesses

To even consider that people can run loose in our American neighborhoods shooting at little children, as happens in Chicago and some other places, is beyond what the average person can hardly believe is happening. Yet, over 100 people were killed in that city over one night. Call it gang violence or anything else…it is a form of “anarchy” when law and order is allowed by those in charge to disappear and call it a “new normal.” That indicates that we “just have to put up with it.”

Police are now being told by some local governments to “stay out of it.” Some places have designated zones where the police are off bounds. When a man was shot and another was critical, the police tried to go to their aid, but was attacked by the mob and they never reached the victims. In these cases, there is no control at all. No peace-loving person is safe…nor is any child.

A child’s sign says it all…for Chicago, New York and many cities

Even if there are people who believe that protesting is their right, which it is as long as it is peaceful, those anarchists who use that protest to strike at the very heart of our country should be called out for what they really are.

Written on St. John Church …BHAZ in today’s meaning… has to do with a place taken by force

200 year old, historic, St. John’s Church, known as the “Church of the Presidents,” was damaged as D.C. Firefighters found a fire in the basement of the church. A large fire also burned outside the church. Unfortunately, the people who set these fires call themselves “Protesters,” but in truth once they become violent to property or persons, they have become anarchists. Every president since James Madison has attended a service at St. John’s. It is a historic site to be protected as is any other American piece of history.

(Photo credit: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

Because Boyer Writes is a Christian blog, I most often would not post a video that some would feel is centered on a political position. However, regardless of who my readers think should be the next President of the United States, I believe it is time to speak out about whoever is elected to the highest office in our land, MUST restore law and order. We cannot have domestic terrorism in America any more than we can have the terrorists from other countries.

I think that every American has the privilege to vote for the person whom they believe to be best qualified to not tolerate the anarchists who would destroy our country. Will that person be perfect in all decisions? Of course not.

However, it will be his or her job, Democrat or Republican, to see that our country is safe from this kind of violence. Voting our beliefs is still one of our greatest freedoms. Let’s pray that it will be the right choice in November. Our future lives depend on it!

Don’t forget those who died to keep our freedom and democracy

So why speak out about anarchists through this blog?

I could not sit with hands folded when I saw the anarchists had spray painted on the beautiful Christian cathedral in Washington, D.C. or were tearing down Christian statues.

In San Francisco, at the Golden Gate Park, the statue of the Christian missionary, St. Junipero Serra was torn down. During the 1800’s there were instances of mistreatment of Native Americans, which gave the anarchists their reasoning for tearing down the statue. We should be learning from the history that we abhor, not destroying it.

Archbishop Gomez of LA had this statement about the priest:

“He preached God’s compassion, fought for the dignity of women and the rights of America’s native peoples, and he was probably the first person in the Americas to make a moral case against capital punishment.”

St Junipero Serra stands tall before being torn down

A vandalized statue of St. Junipero Serra in San Francisco is seen June 19, 2020. The Spanish Franciscan founded several missions in what is now California. (CNS photo/David Zandman via Reuters) 

At the risk of being accused of something I don’t intend, I believe it is my duty to share with you, the reader, one of the most precise, well-thought through videos on this subject. As I write or as you watch your TV to the unfolding of events, the anarchists are planning their next move.

You may not agree to all that is said in this video and that is your privilege and mine. Thank God for free speech in America…while we still have it.

VIDEO: Turn up your sound and click this link: (please note, if you are not commercial free …give it a minute to move passed the commercials..as it will soon load.)

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/trump-polls-republican-gop-operatives-possible-drop-out


President George H.W. Bush

George H.W. Bush as a member of the U.S. Navy during World War II

George H.W. Bush as a member of the U.S. Navy during World War II.

 

george-h-w-bush2

You were a kind and gracious gentleman…a patriot…and our President.

In Honor of President George H.W. Bush 

From Retired Navy Chaplain, William J. Boyer, and his wife, Nancy of Boyer Writes

Slide Presentation: 

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The Christian service of President Bush at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C.   (Turn up sound)

 


Enjoying a “Slow down” with a Historical Gift of Cherry Trees

It has been a few years since I strolled through the Fall leaves and sites of Japan.  The Japanese maples were at their most brilliant colors.  It has been my hope to return someday and see the glorious Spring in Japan when the cherry blossoms are in full bloom.  I may have to wait and see them in Washington, D.C. These cherry trees were given in 1910 as a gift from Japan to the United States, in happier times before World War II.

History of the Cherry Trees in Washington you may not know:

  • In 1885, Eliza Scidmore returned from her first trip to Japan and approached the U.S. Army Superintendent of the Office of Public Buildings and Grounds with the idea of planting cherry trees along the reclaimed waterfront of the Potomac River.
  •  Mrs Scidmore, who was the first female board member of the National Geographic Society, was rebuffed, though she would continue proposing the idea to every Superintendent for the next 24 years!.

    Eliza_Ruhamah_Scidmore proposed planting cherry trees in DC

    Eliza Scidmore

  • Through persistence and some help from Mrs. Taft, the First Lady at the time, in 1909 the Embassy of Japan informed the U.S. Dept of State, the city of Tokyo intended to donate 2000 cherry trees to the United States to be planted along the Potomac.
  •   The first batch of 2,000 trees arrived diseased in 1910.
  • Japanese chemist, Takamine, who discovered adrenaline, was in Washington with Mr. Midzuno, the Japanese consul to New York.  Takamine asked if Mrs. Taft would accept an additional, healthy 2000 trees and she did. The first trees were planted.

    Original Cherry tree planted in Washington near stone Japanese lantern

    This is an original Japanese Cherry tree planted in Washington and is still standing today next to the Japanese lantern.

The Japanese Lantern is a stone statue in West Potomac Park.  It is lighted during the annual National Cherry Blossom Festival. A pair of lanterns were created in 1651, to mark the death of Tokugawa Iemitsu, who was the third shōgun of the Tokugawa dynasty.220px-Iemitu The lantern was formerly located at the Tosho-gu temple, in Ureno Park, where its twin remains today.  The lantern was given, by the governor of Tokyo, to the people of the United States, and was dedicated on March 30, 1954.   (Click here to see a panoramic view of the Tosho-gu temple in Ureno Park, Japan)

History of  Washington cherry trees continued:

  • The first “Cherry Blossom Festival” was held in late 1934 under joint sponsorship by numerous civic groups, becoming an annual event. The cherry trees had by this point become an established part of the nation’s capital.
  • In 1938, plans to cut down the cherry trees to clear ground for the Jefferson Memorial prompted a group of women to chain themselves together at the site in protest.  “This is the worst desecration of beauty in the capital since the burning of the White House by the British,” a woman chained to a tree proclaimed.  Roosevelt, who was President at the time, remained unmoved by the protests.  If the activists didn’t remove themselves, he said, “…the cherry trees, the women and their chains would be gently but firmly transplanted in some other part of Potomac Park.” The women finally left and the particular trees were taken out in the middle of the night to be transplanted in another place.

 

  • A compromise was reached where more trees would be planted along the south side of the Basin to frame the Memorial. These women would be happy to know that there are today 2,750 cherry trees in Washington, D.C.
  • However, World War II brought some problems. On December 11, 1941, four trees were cut down. It is suspected that this was retaliation for the attack on Pearl Harbor by the Empire of Japan four days earlier.
  • In hopes of dissuading people from further attacks upon the trees during the war, they were referred to as “Oriental” flowering cherry trees for the war’s duration.
  •  Suspended during World War II, the festival resumed in 1947 with the support of the Washington, D.C., Board of Trade and the D.C. Commissioners and has been an annual event since then.   (credit: National Cherry Blossom Festival, Wikipedia and Stacy Conradt)

Japanese Cherry Trees in Japan:

Japanese Cherry blossoms3Japanese Cherry blossoms4jpgJapanese Cherry blossoms and Mt Fujipg

 

For my reader’s pleasure, the music you are about to hear has been composed by Peter Helland of Norway.  His purpose was to help the listener to slow down, relax, and enjoy the peacefulness of his music.  Thank you, Peter, for we all need a rest in our often trying world. We also thank you for including the beautiful cherry trees in your video.  (It would be my suggestion to use this music, in its entirety, as background music for rest or something you can do while relaxing.  Enjoy!)

Music and pictures for “slowing down” and relaxation

Video  (Turn up sound)

 


It’s SPRING! The Eagles Know

Eaglesl at Washington

While much of the nation has been piled with snow, the eagles have weathered it all until their little ones could be hatched.  Here is the great event from the live cam above Washington, D.C.

God’s world is so amazing. We give thanks for all its glory.  Welcome to our world, little eagles…for you make it a better place!

Video Credit:  Turn up sound   Cheryl Loheit. © 2018 American Eagle Foundation

 

The live cam link 


The Miracle of Birth…Welcome Moke

gorillas_calaya_and_moke_649a9476

Moke is born at Smithsonian Zoo

Perhaps you missed the arrival of  Moke at the Smithsonian Zoo in Washington, D.C.     Who is Moke, you may ask, and why is this birth important?

Western lowland gorillas are critically endangered with only an estimated 100,000 left.  Calaya, a western lowland gorilla, who has just given birth to her first offspring, a male named Moke, at the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, DC. The arrival of Moke, which means “junior” or “little one” in the Lingala language of Africa, is the zoo’s first such gorilla birth in nine years. (Credit BBC news…Smithsonian)

This is what we learned from two videos posted below.  Be sure to watch both.   In fact, I would recommend to gather around your young children and let them see the miracle of birth…for it should not be a mystery.

Video 1: History of Calaya and the silverback gorilla who is the father of Moke

 

Video 2:  The actual birth of Moke 

  As I watched this birth video, it was impressive to see her so gently clean her newborn and tenderly lay it in the hay.  It appears that she will be a good mother.

We wish the new mother, Calaya, and her new baby, Moke, the best of health and long life.