N.W.BOYER…Christian Author

Posts tagged “William Shakespeare

Thanksgiving in Gold

“All that glitters is not gold.”  

Do you know where this term originated?  For our Thanksgiving post, I’d like to share with you a bit of history…and say that this is a most true statement. We think of solid gold that has great value, as in jewelry or other ornaments.   Sometimes we even speak of people as being “worth their weight in gold.”   Gold is a precious commodity.  Nations have fought over it.  Great gold pieces have been stolen from one land to another.  Gold miners hoped to strike it rich and bet everything in their lives to seek its source.     Yet, there are some things that are even more wonderful than gold.

“The original form of this phrase was ‘all that glisters is not gold’. The ‘glitters’ version long ago superseded the original and is now almost universally used.

“Shakespeare is the best-known writer to have expressed the idea that shiny things aren’t necessarily precious things. The original editions of The Merchant of Venice, 1596, have the line as ‘all that glisters is not gold’. ‘Glister’ is usually replaced by ‘glitter’ in modern renditions of the play…

Various different ways of expressing the idea that ‘all that glitters/glisters is not gold’ were in general circulation well before Shakespeare’s day and it was a common enough notion to have been called proverbial by the 16th century. The 12th-century French theologian Alain de Lille wrote:

Do not hold everything gold that shines like gold”.

Geoffrey Chaucer also expressed the same idea in Middle English in the poem The House of Fame, 1380 –

“Hit is not al gold, that glareth”.

Nevertheless, it is Shakespeare who gave us the version we now use.”  (The Phrase Finder)

.All that glitters is not gold.

So often the color, yellow, is associated with gold.  The sun shines a ray of golden light onto the earth to bring us the things that do not sparkle, as may real gold, but can be enjoyed by both rich and poor.  It is God’s gift to share with us the beautiful golden colors of Fall and throughout the universe with the golden twinkle of a star.  A stripe of gold may adorn a small bird, a little flower, a sunset and many other things on earth. Even the color on my “golden” retriever, Gracie, is a special beauty…and she did not glitter…but oh, was so precious.  We have “golden” anniversaries and friendship that we would not trade for even a tiny speck of gold. We are blessed beyond the price of gold with God’s love to us through His Son, Jesus Christ.  Yes, not all gold glitters..or in Shakespearean days, “glisters.”Golden Retriever and Thanksgiving pumpkin

Boyer Writes brings you one of the most beautiful works of photography in this video entitled: “Sun Paints us Gold” by Tim Janis

Happy Thanksgiving!


Fascinating Places: “England” and “I Vow to Thee, My Country”

From the White Cliffs of Dover to the Cotswolds, England is a beautiful country. History that is fascinating in that it was one of conquest and Kings of many creeds and diverse morals. Some upheld honor; others took honor away.   In a fast changing world, one must look at the diligence in which the people of England stood  firm in the midst of bombs and destruction. It would have seemed only reasonable that King Albert and his Queen would flee to safety during World War II terrible times.  Yet they stayed and saw it through with their people.  ( Another writing will feature Sir Winston Churchill and The Queen Mum)

The famous writers from this country have had their say about their homeland:

There is a forgotten, nay almost forbidden word, which means more to me than any other. That word is England.”Winston Churchill

“Heaven take thy soul, and England keep my bones!”William Shakespeare

“I traveled among unknown men,
In lands beyond the sea:
Nor England! Did I know till then
What love I bore to thee.”
– William Wordsworth

Below is a video of beautiful England with the lyrics taken from a poem by Cecil Spring-Rice, written in 1908.   At the time, he was with the British Embassy in Stockholm, Sweden.   At first the poem was called Urbs Dei (The Two Fatherlands).   It says that the Christian owes two loyalties, both to her homeland and to the Kingdom of Heaven.   How strongly he must have felt about the place of his birth to write of this.  Filled with a patriotic spirit which many people seem to have lost for their homeland around the world, we may learn something from this pointed poem.

While serving as the British Ambassador to the United States, Rice tried to persuade President Woodrow Wilson to give up on neutrality and join Britain in the war against Germany.   Finally the USA entered the war and there were huge losses to the British during this time.  Rice then changed  the title of the poem…I Vow to Thee, My Country.

The first verse reminds the listener of those who died for freedom in the First World War.  The second verse says, “And there’s another country...” which is referring to being with God. Taken from Proverbs 3:17, it reads, “Her ways are of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace…”

Music was later written by Gustav Holst in 1921.  It was first performed in 1925 and has become a standard music when honoring those fallen in battle for England.  Z. Randall Stroope made the choir arrangement  and added two more verses to the music in honor of his father who marched in the Bataan Death March.

Lyrics to I Vow To Thee, My Country is found below the video.  (Turn on sound)

I vow to thee, my country, all earthly things above,
Entire and whole and perfect, the service of my love;
The love that asks no question, the love that stands the test,
That lays upon the altar the dearest and the best;
The love that never falters, the love that pays the price,
The love that makes undaunted the final sacrifice.

I heard my country calling, away across the sea,
Across the waste of waters she calls and calls to me.
Her sword is girded at her side, her helmet on her head,
And round her feet are lying the dying and the dead.
I hear the noise of battle, the thunder of her guns,
I haste to thee my mother, a son among thy sons.

And there’s another country, I’ve heard of long ago,
Most dear to them that love her, most great to them that know;
We may not count her armies, we may not see her King;
Her fortress is a faithful heart, her pride is suffering;
And soul by soul and silently her shining bounds increase,
And her ways are ways of gentleness, and all her paths are peace.


Words of Love

You are loved!

My bounty is as boundless as the sea,
My love as deep; the more I give to thee,
The more I have,
for both are infinite.

William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet

 

 

For God so loved the world that He gave His only Son that whosoever believes in Him shall not perish, but have everlasting life.  John 3:16  The Holy Bible

 

To all of you  lovers who read Boyer Writes, we wish you a Happy Valentine’s Day.  Enjoy our love video below!  Thank you to Disney’s  The Lady and the Tramp